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వైవిధ్యం కరువైన ఉస్మానియా- కడెంపల్లి సుధాకర్ గౌడ్ ఏప్రిల్ 25, 2017

Posted by M Bharath Bhushan in agitation, Culture, Deccan, Hyderabad, Identity, movement, Mulki, Osmania, politics, regionalism, struggle, students, Telugu (తెలుగు), universities, Urdu, youth.
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vaividyam karuvaina osmania -sudhakar goud

Telangana, the 29th state of India, and grouse of Parakala Prabhakars ఏప్రిల్ 6, 2014

Posted by M Bharath Bhushan in Andhra, Fazal Ali Commission, Hyderabad, Identity, Jai Andhra, Kakatiya, Mulki, Polavaram, regionalism, Settler, Sonia, TDP, Telangana, Telugu, TRS, Urdu, Warangal, YSR.
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India’s Newest State Telangana Is Bosnia Redux
Kranti Rai, The Daily Beast, 03.22.14

By acquiescing to the formation of a new state, Telangana, India is setting a dangerous precedent of ethnic division.

By acquiescing in the formation of a new state called Telangana, India has succumbed to the greatest political fraud in its modern history. Andhra Pradesh, stretching from central to peninsular India, is larger than New Zealand. The Telugu-speaking Indians who predominate the state, numbering roughly 80 million, are more numerous than the French or the British. (Satya Nadella, the new CEO of Microsoft, is a Telugu, as is Nina Davuluri, the reigning Miss USA.) The Telugus’ contribution to recent Indian history has been both constructive and corrosive. If the flag of independent India was the product of a Telugu patriot’s inclusive imagination, the map of contemporary India is the consequence of the Telugus’ insularity. It was the Telugus’ agitation in the 1950s for cultural and linguistic homogeneity that prompted the restructuring of Indian territory into linguistic states. Andhra Pradesh was born on November 1, 1956, as free India’s first state.

To its proponents Andhra was the meridian, after 600 years of division and dispersal, of Telugu civilization. It was the largest state in peninsular India, returned the second-largest contingent of MPs to the Indian parliament, housed the third-largest linguistic bloc in the country, and was the geographic intersection that bridged north and south. But the moment could not be sustained. Less than 60 years after its historic creation, Andhra is poised to be partitioned once again. The irony is that the Telugus, having precipitated the reorganization of India by invoking language as a legitimate instrument of political mobilization, will now become the only major linguistic minority within India to be divided by boundaries. (మరింత…)

Interfaith harmony in the medieval Deccan ఏప్రిల్ 29, 2012

Posted by M Bharath Bhushan in Articles, Culture, Deccan, Godavari, Hindu, Identity, Muslim, Poetry & Songs, regionalism, Telugu, Urdu, Velama.
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Interfaith harmony common in the medieval Deccan
Sajjad Shahid | Apr 29, 2012, The Times of India

I saw fragrance fleeing, when the bee came/ What a wonder! / I saw intellect fleeing, when the heart came / I saw the temple fleeing, when God came. (Allama Prabhu, 12th century mystic poet of the Deccan)

In contrast to north India, where the first incursions by those professing the Islamic faith had been of a violent nature, the initial encounters between original inhabitants of the Deccan and Muslim settlers had been in the field of trade and commerce. This crucial difference was instrumental in promoting amicable relations between the two communities, providing an atmosphere conducive for interfaith dialogue leading to a better understanding of the other.

In consequence there evolved a distinct culture, tangible in its varied manifestations, which was enthusiastically patronized and nurtured by the Deccan monarchs leading to a distinct identity for the region. Unfortunately, due to its vilification by bigots over the recent past this glorious legacy which was sustained over centuries has come under a grave threat of complete obliteration as evident from the increased polarization between different sections of society. (మరింత…)

Telangana is topic of research in universities of the region ఏప్రిల్ 23, 2011

Posted by M Bharath Bhushan in 1969, agitation, Andhrapreneurship, conflict resolution, Culture, Deccan, Economy, GHMC, Godavari, heritage, Hyderabad, Identity, Kakatiya, movement, Mulki, Osmania, politics, regionalism, Settler, suicide, Telangana, Telugu, Telugu (తెలుగు), universities, Urdu, violence.
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Scholars in a scramble to do research on T
Nikhila Henry, TNN, April 23, 2011

HYDERABAD: The “T” agitation that has played havoc with academic schedules of state universities has had an inadvertent `academic’ side effect. Varsities are now reporting a spurt in research on Telangana this admission season in politically charged university campuses.

Making a beeline to study all things about `T’ are young researchers wanting to take up topics related to the agitation for political and social analysis. Officials of both state and central universities say they are flooded with PhD proposals on cultural and political topics that are specific to the region.

If until a couple of years ago, research on Telangana was largely done in the domain of history, political science and sociology, students from literature and even media classrooms are applying for PhDs on the `T’ region. Subjects they are choosing range from public policy and conflict resolution in the region, economics of regional politics to cultural representations of the region in Telugu literature and linguistic nationalism. (మరింత…)

Merits & qualifications of new Telugu Chief Minister జూలై 10, 2010

Posted by Telangana Utsav in agitation, compromise, Congress, Culture, Hyderabad, Identity, Mulki, politics, Rayalaseema, Reddy, SC, Telangana, Urdu, Y S Jagan.
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Cong mulling a Reddy CM to stop Jaganaut?
TNN, Jul 9, 2010

HYDERABAD: The Congress high command, caught between a mild-mannered chief minister K Rosaiah and an aggressive Y S Jaganmohan Reddy, is believed to be working on a grand design to stave off the looming menace to its authority. Central to this plan is the induction of a Reddy chief minister if the Jagan threat continues.

With the Congress in the state being perceived as a Reddy dominated party, the thinking is that a Reddy alone can act as a counter balance to the growing clout of Jagan. “Reddys by and large are with the party. This is the only group which is numerically strong, cohesive and the party can bank on it for support, financial or otherwise. At present, Reddys alone can lead the party to victory,” said a senior party leader. (మరింత…)

Muslim Forum for Telangana demands separate state జూన్ 8, 2010

Posted by Telangana Utsav in Andhra, Appeals, CharMinar, Congress, Culture, Hyderabad, Identity, MIM, Mulki, Muslim, Nizam, Osmania, Police, politics, Rayalaseema, Settler, students, TDP, Telangana, Telugu, TRS, universities, Urdu, violence, YSR.
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4 వ్యాఖ్యలు

Muslim Forum for Telangana
H.No. 2-3-48/A/9, Amberpet, Hyderabad- 500013
Contact No’s: 9391051586, 9492063948, Fax: 27403392
Email id: muslimforumfortelangana@gmail.com

To,
The Chairman,
Committee for Consultations on the Situation in Andhra Pradesh. (CCSAP)

Respected Sir,

Subject: There is no meaning for silence when there is a need to speak for Justice. Muslim Forum for Telangana demands separate Telangana State.

Introduction:

People from different walks of life and organizations came together and had series of discussions since 2006 on Muslim role for separate Telangana state. Muslim and non Muslim intellectuals participated in these meetings. All of them discussed and expressed their opinions and also gave their valuable suggestions. The main outcome of the meetings was the formation of a forum to work towards making people aware, especially Muslims. This forum was formed and named as Muslim Forum for Telangana in the year 2008. (మరింత…)

Fasting, Mining, Politicking? Telangana & the Burdens of History – D Parthasarathy మే 21, 2010

Posted by Telangana Utsav in agitation, Andhra, Andhrapreneurship, BCs, Congress, Culture, Economy, fast, Hyderabad, JAC, Jai Andhra, Kamma, KCR, MRPS, Naxalite, Polavaram, politics, Rayalaseema, Reddy, regionalism, Settler, ST, suicide, TDP, Telangana, TRS, Urdu, Velama, violence, Y S Jagan, YSR.
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Fasting, Mining, Politicking? Telangana and the Burdens of History

D.Parthasarathy

The burdens of history are many for Telangana as they are for most regions of the world whose people have been historically subjected to domination, oppression and exploitation. These burdens are cumulative and imbricate each other, and result not only in various forms of ‘backwardness’, but also in ways of perceiving a problem and modes of struggle that reify and reflect those burdens rather than enable subject populations to look for meaningful alternatives. Telangana has been witness to a long history of struggles, some initiated by its own populations, others instigated from outside, and yet others forged by radical or bourgeois class alliances across regions. Whether or not the people of Telangana get a separate state, what they are desperately seeking for is agency. What is however worth emphasizing is that, if the current round of protests and agitations are to yield rewards for the region’s long suffering and distressed classes, some at least of the parties involved need to find ways of escaping the past and instead search for new methods of agitation and new vocabularies to articulate an alternate politics that truly reflects the frustrations, grievances, and aspirations of the troubled region.

The formation of Linguistic States, although essential, cannot be decided by any sort of hooliganism. Nor must it be solved in a manner that will serve party interest. It must be solved by cold blooded reasoning.
B. R. Ambedkar
Thoughts on Linguistic States, 1955

The morality of Gandhi’s emotional athyachar through his fast unto death preceding the Poona Pact of 1932 is rarely called into question by his many admirers, followers and scholarly acolytes. While criticism of Gandhi’s tactics by dalits and those who adopt a dalit/ bahujan perspective in their analyses is seen as partial and subjective, the long term consequences of this Gandhian method of protest to get others to toe your line has not been taken seriously despite the frequent use of this method for contentious goals and objectives. The simultaneous use of Gandhian methods of fasting and street violence by groups ostensibly fighting for a separate Telangana state, and similar counter strategies resorted to by pro-United Andhra groups may constitute a “grammar of anarchy” as Ambedkar warned in his closing speech to the Constituent Assembly. Ambedkar also castigated other Gandhian methods such as civil disobedience, non-cooperation and satyagraha, arguing that in a post-independent nation there was no “justification for these, …where constitutional methods are open”. The tendency of diverse groups in India to resort to unconstitutional methods derives in large part from a partisan state that selectively uses force when it fears legitimate protests and demands, and turns a blind eye to violence when it is perpetrated by groups closely allied to those who people the state. The Indian state’s rapid response to Gandhian fasting methods in this case needs to be seen against the backdrop of hundreds of more legitimate demands by diverse groups around the country which are equally rapidly put down with brutal force, even as the demands take decades to be addressed if at all they are taken seriously.

That significant decisions that decide the fate of millions are still taken as a response to unconstitutional methods, to hooliganism, and in ways that “serve (specific) party interests”, rather than by recourse to “cold blooded reasoning”, and institutionalized debates, is as much a sign of the evolution of our political society, as it is a symptom of the deep gulf between the two broad streams of Gandhian and Ambedkarite political norms that we have inherited. Such methods of protest constitute only one of several burdens from the past that we carry and that affect how we govern ourselves, how democracy works for different sections of our population. For, as Ambedkar perhaps would have been the first to acknowledge, street violence by supporters of a Telangana state are but a direct reaction to deep levels of frustration resulting from political misrule, the absence of meaningful development and empowerment, and the failure of diverse political and social groups to understand, articulate or express their genuine grievances. But more importantly, street violence and hooliganism that target both coastal Andhra elites and middle class and poor migrants from the Andhra region settled in Hyderabad and other urban centres in Telangana are also a response to mindless police brutality. Police brutality and administrative violence in Telangana cannot be understood in simplistic terms as the action of the state apparatus supporting the interests of the ruling class, though this may in large part be true. We need to recognize that the state has interests of its own, that the state apparatus behaves in habitual ways, is disposed to react by virtue of a certain habitus, and that the agents of the state also constitute a class by virtue of their social status, property ownership position, and surplus extraction function. That diverse groups fighting for a Telangana state – be it the TRS or the JAC – have simply failed to understand, far less address the grievances and frustrations of the youth of the region can also be seen in the way in which personal troubles are linked to public issues1 – reflected in the scores of suicides and suicide bids that are currently taking place. In many ways the street violence and suicides are expressions of the fact that vast sections of Telangana’s population have been among the politically ‘uncounted2’ despite the long history of the Telangana movement. One might even argue that the politics surrounding the Telangana state, the hijacking of the demand by parties which do not truly represent or comprehend the aspirations of those they pretend to represent, the street violence and suicides – all of these in fact are reflective of a politics involving the “inscription of a part of those who have no part”3, in other words the attempts by those who have hitherto not been represented adequately to make their voices heard. (మరింత…)

Srikrishna Committee concludes consultations మే 13, 2010

Posted by Telangana Utsav in agitation, BJP, compromise, conflict resolution, CPI, CPI-M, drama, Greater Rayalaseema, Hyderabad, Identity, JAC, livelihoods, MIM, Mulki, Parliament, politics, Rayalaseema, regionalism, Sonia, students, suicide, TDP, Telangana, TRS, Urdu, Uttara Andhra.
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Telangana: Srikrishna panel concludes Hyderabad visit
PTI, May 12, 2010

HYDERABAD: The Srikrishna committee, set up to study the demand for separate Telangana, concluded its three-day visit to the city on Wednesday by seeking cross-section of views from political parties and different groups.

The committee heard the views of three groups from Telugu Desam, city-based Majlis Ittehadul Muslimeen (MIM), the Joint Action Committee espousing the cause of united Andhra Pradesh, a trade and industry body, Telangana Freedom Fighters Forum and Telangana Cultural Association among others.

While the Telugu Desam leaders from Telangana wanted a separate state, those from coastal Andhra and Rayalaseema stressed on the need to keep the state united.

Significantly, MIM, a major force in Hyderabad, strongly argued for keeping the state united failing which it favoured creating a state with Telangana and Rayalaseema. (మరింత…)

Hyderabad is inseparable from Telangana: Asaduddin Owaisi, MIM ఏప్రిల్ 18, 2010

Posted by Telangana Utsav in Culture, Economy, Fazal Ali Commission, Hyderabad, Identity, MIM, Mulki, Muslim, politics, Rayalaseema, Telangana, Urdu.
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MIM bats for Greater Telangana
April 18, 2010 IANS

Ending its silence over the Telangana issue, the Majlis-e-Ittehadul Muslimeen (MIM) on Sunday opposed the demand for union territory status to Hyderabad and suggested that if the bifurcation of Andhra Pradesh becomes inevitable, a Greater Telangana state comprising Telangana and Rayalseema regions be formed.

MIM, a key political force in Hyderabad, said it was basically for continuing the present status of Andhra Pradesh with constitutional guarantees to Telangana.

“However, if the division becomes inevitable, Greater Telangana state should be formed with Hyderabad as the capital,” the party said.
The party has expressed its views on the issue in a memorandum submitted to the Srikrishna committee, which is looking into the demands for and against a separate Telangana state. (మరింత…)

Kaloji and Telangana : Damodar Rao మార్చి 12, 2010

Posted by Telangana Utsav in agitation, Andhra, Culture, Identity, Mulki, politics, regionalism, Telangana, Urdu.
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Remembering Kaloji
K. Damodar Rao

The Hindu, Arts/Books March 12, 2010

Kaloji Narayana Rao’s multi-faceted traits made him an extra-ordinary person

Kaloji Narayana Rao, the doyen of literary, social, and political activism for nearly two generations in the state and a Padma Vibhushan awardee, was fondly remembered for his contribution to civil life, participation in public life, oral leanings in literary creation in a seminar on his life and literature held recently at Kakatiya University, Warangal.
Rebel and a rishi

He was a rebel, a rishi, an activist, an orator, a commentator, a chronicler, a conversationalist, reminisced the many luminary-speakers who participated in the seminar. The best tribute that could be paid to Kaloji, as he is popularly known, would be to continue his legacy of protest and defiance, they averred. (మరింత…)